Finding Your Own Passion

When I was young, I wanted to be a teacher. I had a desk that I set up in my room and pretended that I was teaching my dolls. When I got into high school, I wanted to be a psychologist. The way people think and how people learn has been a subject of great interest to me for most of my young adult and adult life.

When I was 18, I got married and then got pregnant. My dreams of studying psychology at the University of Chicago shattered as I worked at Chick-fil-A, first as counter help, then as a shift manager, and finally as a marketing director. I hated marketing. It was challenging, so it held my interest, but I had no idea what I was doing and I was learning as I went. When bringing in new customers is your job and you have no idea how to do it, things can get pretty frustrating pretty fast. Not to mention the fact that I was a shift manager and the marketing director at the same time – I had to do most of my marketing job at home, off the clock.

When I gave birth to my second child, I said good-bye to the fast food industry. I had begun thinking about going back to school and majoring in education. I got a job working in child care (admittedly, it was a job of convenience at the time), and quickly discovered that I loved it. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, the job fit in nicely with my passions of education and psychology. Years – and hundreds of hours of research – later, I am realizing that I have landed in my passion and am doing everything I can to learn about the field and the psychology of learning, creativity, motivation, and other aspects of education.

Recalling the story of how I landed in my passion makes me realize that discovering and acting on your passion is sometimes not easy. I got lucky in that my job of convenience turned out to be the path to my true passion. Some people are not that lucky. Some people end up on a path simply because they are good at something. Sir Ken Robinson talks about a woman who started out as a concert pianist. She has dinner with a conductor one night, who points out to her that he can tell that she does not enjoy being a concert pianist. She realizes that her true passion is literature and she becomes a book editor. Other people that I know are doing what they are doing simply because the circumstances of their lives called for swift action – a job of convenience, like my initial job in child care.

I haven’t talked to too many people about what their passion is, if they are doing their passion, or if they are going to be involved in their passion in the future. It would probably lead to many interesting conversations. Maybe instead of talking about reading and reviewing a book that I already know I probably won’t finish, I should talk to people about their passions. I am looking forward to having the opportunity of doing that during the workshop, although I know that for some people the process of discovering their passion is a deep and personal one. When I went through the process of discovering my passion for the classroom, it took me a week of deep soul searching, and I haven’t shared the results of that process with anyone. My hope is that I can share my process with others and they can use it to discover what they are passionate about in the classroom, and it can inspire them as it inspired me. My hope is that it makes a difference.

Note: In the first draft of this post, I spent a great deal of time talking about book reviews, after I mentioned something about reviewing another book by Sir Ken Robinson about people finding their passion. Through the reflection that I did during the first draft, I realized that book reviewing is not for me – it definitely is not my passion. Therefore I will not be reviewing Ungifted by Scott Barry Kaufman. Although the first 250 pages of the book blew my mind (I loved it), I have come to the realization that I probably won’t finish the book. I hate to disappoint, but I do have to say that if you are interested in the psychology of intelligence, creativity, and motivation, it will definitely be a great read for you.

Advertisements

One comment on “Finding Your Own Passion

  1. Pingback: Focus and Creativity | Uplifting Freedom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s